Art, Humor

12.6.16 Art Project: Rules Don’t Apply

The past few months have been rocky in my art world but I’m trying. Between preparing for Christmas presents and total lack of ambition, I’ve been working on a couple of art pieces to keep my creativity flowing.

October was a wonderful month because my painting His Face ending up selling, along with a watercolor painting.

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As soon as I was finished with His Face and had it hung in the Bushwick Open Studio in Brooklyn, I immediately began my most risky piece.

I’ve always wanted to do a three canvas split scene, and finally after almost three months, it’s completed and I’m thrilled with the outcome.

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It is currently up on my website, but I’ve also submitted this piece to a gallery in New York and I will find out just after the New Year if it has been accepted. KEEP YOUR FINGERS CROSSED.

My friend Colleen told me that she’d like to learn how to paint and if I could somehow teach her, which of course I would be honored. I know I may have mentioned this in my other art posts but I will say it again just in case: I don’t necessarily have a clear and direct plan when I paint. That’s the wonderful world of abstract art. Nothing has to be perfect. It’s all free form, which means, anyone can learn how to paint. But in case you were curious about my process, I’ll explain in bullet points:

  • I find a photo, mostly on websites such as unsplash.com where you can take any of the photos and do what you please with them.
  • With acrylics, I use a base color. I pick the most commonly used color in the picture and cover the entire canvas with it.
  • Since acrylics dry so quickly, I then go back in and form some kind of outline of the painting on the canvas, preferably in white, or just a lighter shade of the base color.
  • After the doodling, I return to the painting and add in the specific details which can be of your choice. If you want water to have more texture, that can be your detail. Or if you’d like to focus on bark instead of leaves, you can do that too. You can do whatever your mind initially tells you to do, which is why I enjoy Paint Bars for Wine & Paint Night. Everyone is painting the same picture, but they all come out unique.
  • The photo is simply a reference point. I never look at a photo and try to copy it completely. It’s merely there to guide me if I get lost in the process. I use it as inspiration, not a goal.

Some artists to remember when it comes to breaking the rules:

Jackson Pollock

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Henri Matisse

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Pablo Picasso

mediterranean-landscape

The other day as I strolled through Michael’s, I found oil paint with 18 assorted colors for the low low price of $14. I was floored. I’ve been avoiding oil paints since high school because of how expensive it can get (one tube of oil paint can cost you more than $15). But I splurged and bought the pack of oil paints, a painter’s knife, and jars for my linseed oil.

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Back in the day, my friends and I used to call linseed oil/turpentine “mineral spirits”. People still call it mineral spirits but it just sounded so mystical.

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I’ve decided to re-teach myself how to paint with oils and I’m both nervous and excited. I’m nervous because I remember my high school days quietly cursing myself if I screwed up a section because it was such a process to fix. And I don’t know if anyone has accidentally spilled linseed oil on their pants before, but it’s a total artistic buzzkill. And there’s always the risk of accidentally drinking the linseed oil/dirty water, mistaking it for your drink, or shoving your dirty paintbrushes inside your drink cup. I know we’ve all been there. But I’m determined to make this oil paint adventure work, no matter how much I’d like to stab my eye out with my paint knife.

Wish me luck friends.

Please check out my website if you’d like to see what else I’ve been up to!

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